The Literary Encyclopedia Travel Award 2016

The awards went to:

Andrew Keener, PhD candidate, Northwestern University - “Theaters of Translation: Cosmopolitan Vernaculars in Shakespeare’s England”
The research project examines the connections between Renaissance drama and 16th &17th century language-learning publications: the project argues that the works of William Shakespeare, Mary Sidney, Ben Jonson, and other playwrights exemplify “cosmopolitan vernaculars,” both on the page and on the stage. By this term, the author refers to multiple, non-classical languages in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries that overlap, intersect, and communicate with each other across a wide variety of manuscript and printed materials, literary and non-literary. This project employs a forensic approach to surviving multilingual dictionaries, grammars, and dialogue books in order to identify cosmopolitan vernaculars and to analyze their functions in dramatic settings.

Anne Royston, PhD Candidate, Utah University“Between Theory and Artist’s Book: Materiality, Writing, Technology”
The project traces a genealogy of experimental “artists’ books” (from Bataille and Derrida through Avital Ronell, Mark C. Taylor, and Johanna Drucker), aiming to address the interface of information and materiality. It is framed by questions of “media-specificity” (how a text communicates; how media-specific practices, applied to both analog and digital technologies, shape our understanding of what we read), but, while most media-specific work is oriented to the new media of digital-cultural, this project considers a no less urgent set of questions about the affordances of “old media”, how the book works as a formal and material technology that solicits and enables particular modes of reading and attention. Steeped in the traditions of continental philosophy, each of the chosen texts interrogates the very conditions of book production, organization, and reception, and how, in doing so, they make unusual demands on their readers.

AND

Spenser Tricker, PhD candidate, Miami University - “‘A Healthful Industry’: Racialized Labor and Pacific Piracy in James Fenimore Cooper’s The Crater”
This research project seeks to shift the focus of nineteenth-century American literary studies away from its conventional emphasis on transatlantic exchanges to a reconsideration of Pacific contexts. An additional innovation is its comparative, bilingual approach (the first section explores the work of canonical American writers James Fenimore Cooper and Herman Melville, while the second addresses the Hispanophone work of Filipino nationalist figure José Rizal and the writings of Asian-American author Sui Sin Far). It thus attends to a wide array of canonical and less conventional literary works, maintaining that the gothic genre developed concomitantly with the creation of the arbitrary islander in nineteenth-century U.S literary history. This genre proved especially well-suited to imagining the Pacific world as a foreboding and epistemologically vexing site populated with figures that threatened U.S. imperial and commercial ambitions. The research develops its own account of biopolitics that revises as much as it draws on this discourse’s theoretical suppositions. Finally, it builds upon the recent turn away from strictly symptomatic readings of the gothic to examine how this genre works on the surface to depict emerging rather than repressed threats to Anglo-American culture.

You can read the reports on the research results achieved here:

The Literary Encyclopedia Travel Award 2015

The awards went to:

Robert Imes, PhD candidate, University of Saskatchevan‘A History of Leicestershire Chorographies: From Leland to Burton’
Imes’ research surveys the development of early modern chorographies (regional geographical texts) of Leicestershire, focusing in particular on the corpus of cartographer William Smith (1550-1618) in order to contextualize a uniquely sophisticated map of Leicestershire that he published in William Burton’s (1575-1645) Description of Leicestershire (1622). His research engages dynamically the work of scholars who study early modern chorography and cartography, but the analyses of original primary texts that he will undertake in Oxford with the help of this travel grant will facilitate the inclusion of these lesser-known texts in the larger scholarly community. In its conjunction of primary textual analysis with larger geographical, bibliographical and cartographic contexts, this project tunes in with our desire to explore and encourage intellectual and scholarly research into all aspects of cultural geography.

AND

Dr Anne Markey, Dublin City University, Editor for the Irish Literature volume of The Literary Encyclopedia‘The Godwins’ Juvenile Library’
This project aims to compare and contrast the extent to which the Juvenile Library, established in 1805 by William Godwin and his second wife, Mary Jane, can be described as a vehicle for social and political reform and the extent to which its output reflected the demands and constraints of the early nineteenth-century market in children's books. The grant will enable Anne to complete research (by consulting the Osborne Collection of Children’s books in Toronto, whose holdings include approximately 40 Juvenile Library publications) which will contribute significantly to critical revaluations of Georgian children’s literature as well as to ongoing assessments of William Godwin’s work and legacy.

You can read the reports on the research results achieved here:

The Emory Elliott Undergraduate Memorial Prize

This prize was discontinued in 2012 and replaced by our Research Travel Award, a competition launched in January every year.

Click here to see the 2011 Prize-winning Essays.

Click here to see the 2010 Prize-winning Essays.

Click here to see the 2009 Prize-winning Essays.