Among the large number of testimonies from survivors of the Nazi extermination and concentration camps, Charlotte Delbo’s contribution is one of the most haunting. Her aim, as a survivor of Auschwitz-Birkenau, was not only to testify for the dead as well as for herself, but to make the reader feel “la vérité de la tragédie en restituant l’émotion et l’horreur” [the truth of the tragedy by recreating the emotion and the horror] (Delbo 1965). She wanted the reader to see this unimaginable reality with the help of literature, particularly poetic language, because “la poésie est le langage de la vérité” [poetry is t…

Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are a member (student of staff) of a subscribing institution (see List), you should be able to access the LE on campus directly (without the need to log in), and off-campus either via the institutional log in we offer, or via your institution's remote access facilities, or by creating a personal user account with your institutional email address. If you are not a member of a subscribing institution, you will need to purchase a personal subscription. For more information on how to subscribe as an individual user, please see under Individual Subcriptions.

Thatcher, Nicole. "Charlotte Delbo". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 05 July 2008
[, accessed 07 October 2015.]