Emile Gaboriau

(1256 words)
  • Andrea Goulet

Known to us as the “father of French detective fiction”, Emile Gaboriau preferred the term “judiciary novel” to describe the crime stories that brought him widespread success in the 1860s. Indeed, his best-known works – L’Affaire Lerouge (1865), Le Crime d’Orcival (1866), and Monsieur Lecoq (1868) – owe as much to the titillating exposure of the French justice system as to the deductive skills of his detectives Lecoq and Tabaret. But it was Gaboriau’s narrative formula of crime-investigation-discovery, inspired directly by Edgar Allan Poe’s founding tale The Murders in the Rue Morgue (…

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Goulet, Andrea. "Emile Gaboriau". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 13 April 2007
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=1662, accessed 10 October 2015.]

Related Groups

  1. Crime, Detective, Spy/ Thriller Fiction