Raymond Williams (1871 words)

  • Fred Inglis (University of Sheffield)

Raymond Williams was a figure of extraordinary dominance in Britain across a wide range not only in literary and cultural inquiry but of intellectual and political opposition as well. He was, with Richard Hoggart, the first, local architect of what is now the international discipline of Cultural Studies; he combined, with rare assurance, the roles of professor of literature (drama, to be precise) at Cambridge, public intellectual and ecumenical leader of radical causes, and multiple author of seven novels, a number of plays (one for television) and two dozen more-than-academic books, more like studies of a disunited kingdom's life-and-times-and-formation, including the several hundred pieces of his collected journalism stretching over …

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Citation:
Inglis, Fred. "Raymond Williams". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 22 November 2001
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=4736, accessed 19 August 2017.]

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