The Self and Subjectivity in The Middle Ages

(3269 words)

Defining self and subjectivity

As a term, “self” refers to the inward perception of a person's individual character. It is a term that relates to how we see our own personality and our actions; it guides our interaction with other individuals and those institutions of which our society is comprised. As Stephen Greenblatt notes:

…there are always selves – a sense of personal order, a characteristic mode of address to the world, a structure of bounded desires – and always some element of deliberate shaping in the formation and expression of identity. (Stephen Greenblatt. Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare. Chicago & London: University of Chicago Press, 1980, 1)
Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are not a subscriber, please click here to read about membership. All our articles have been written recently by experts in their field, more than 95% of them university professors.

Citation:
Cummings, Raymond. "The Self and Subjectivity in The Middle Ages". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 17 November 2007
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=1749, accessed 19 April 2014.]