Black Power

(2490 words)

Historical Context Essay


The term “Black Power”, although commonly used to denote the militant political ethos which emerged from the African-American civil rights movement during the latter half of the 1960s, was a mercurial, malleable concept in reality, which came to encapsulate an array of political groups, ideological standpoints and cultural movements. The phrase engendered consternation amongst white and black sections of society alike from its first “official” utterance on the Meredith March in 1966 by Willie Ricks [Mukasa Dada] and Stokely Carmichael [Kwame Ture], then chairman of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Standing at the intersection of Freedom and Love Street in Itta Bena, Mississippi, Carmichael …

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Citation:
Torrubia, Rafael. "Black Power". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 07 July 2011
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=17634, accessed 28 July 2015.]


Related Groups

  1. American Civil-Rights Movement in the 1960s