Beside Heine’s Lorelei, Mignon (from French “cute”, “darling”) has become the most successful heroine of German literature with a European-wide echo in fiction, music, and painting since her appearance as an enigmatic character in Goethe’s Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre [Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship, 1795-96] and the first separate publication of her four songs in 1815. After Wilhelm buys her freedom from a brutal circus-troupe director, who had abducted her in Italy and used her as an acrobat in a male outfit, she devotes herself completely to her savior whom she grows to love in secret and unrequited. What shaped her reception as a larger-than-life figure is her mysterious …

Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are a member (student of staff) of a subscribing institution (see List), you should be able to access the LE on campus directly (without the need to log in), and off-campus either via the institutional log in we offer, or via your institution's remote access facilities, or by creating a personal user account with your institutional email address. If you are not a member of a subscribing institution, you will need to purchase a personal subscription. For more information on how to subscribe as an individual user, please see under Individual Subcriptions.

Citation:
Hoffmeister, Gerhart. "Goethe's Mignon and Her Reception". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 11 October 2011
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=17656, accessed 03 September 2015.]


Related Groups

  1. Comparative Literature, Reception, Influences