C. S. Lewis: The Chronicles of Narnia

(1112 words)
  • Peter Schakel
  • The Literary Encyclopedia. Volume 11: Theory, Philosophy, Concepts: History of Ideas and Science.

The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy stories for children by C. S. Lewis. The best-known and most influential of his writings, they outsell the rest of his works combined, with millions of copies in print. Regarded as classics by many authorities on children's literature, they are read and loved by college students and other adults as well as by children and adolescents. Their popularity is probably not just a passing thing, moreover. Most Lewis scholars consider the Chronicles the mostly likely of Lewis's works to endure.

The earliest books in the series focus on the four Pevensie children. In the first and most famous, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950), Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy enter the …

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Schakel, Peter. "The Chronicles of Narnia". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 20 June 2003
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=12382, accessed 29 November 2015.]

Related Groups

  1. Children's Literature
  2. Young Adult Literature