John Ford: The Grapes of Wrath

(1812 words)

While film critic Joseph Millichap (Steinbeck and Film) considers Lewis Milestone's screen version of Of Mice and Men (United Artists 1939) as the most faithful film version of a Steinbeck novel, he concedes that John Ford's adaptation of The Grapes of Wrath is both the most popular and most important of the cinematic translations of Steinbeck's work. Though viewers of Ford's Grapes of Wrath (1940) must acknowledge that the director condenses, changes and perhaps even distorts Steinbeck's novel, the film has certainly become the source of the most pervasive and powerful images of 1930's America.

Luckily for Steinbeck, Ford was steeped in the documentary tradition that had impacted many of the …

Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are not a subscriber, please click here to read about membership. All our articles have been written recently by experts in their field, more than 95% of them university professors.

Citation:
Meyer, Michael J.. "The Grapes of Wrath". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 04 January 2010
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=13155, accessed 19 December 2014.]