Vasilii Grossman: Zhizn' i sud'ba [Life and Fate]

(3117 words)

After Stalin’s death in 1953, Grossman enjoyed a period of public success. He was awarded a prestigious decoration, “The Red Banner of Labour”, and Za pravoe delo (For a Just Cause), the first of his two Stalingrad novels, was republished. Meanwhile he was writing two masterpieces, neither of which was to be published in Russia until the late 1980s: Zhizn’ i sud’ba (Life and Fate) and Vse techet (Everything Flows). Though sometimes described as a sequel to the politically less heretical For a Just Cause, Life and Fate is better seen as a separate novel that includes many of the same characters.

Life and Fate is important both as literature and as history. Grossman a…

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Citation:
Chandler, Robert. "Zhizn' i sud'ba". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 25 November 2010
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=21502, accessed 27 May 2016.]


Related Groups

  1. World War 2 Literature
  2. Gulag and Anti-Stalinist Narratives