Slavoj Žižek: Did Somebody Say Totalitarianism? Five Interventions in the (Mis)use of a Notion

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One of Slavoj Žižek’s most spirited and controversial books is Did Somebody Say Totalitarianism? Five Interventions in the (Mis)use of a Notion (2001). This book (abbreviated Totalitarianism below) is a witty and pointed attack on contemporary political attitudes, especially in “today’s self-professed ‘radical’ academia” (p. 1). Žižek’s Introduction introduces the thesis of the book, namely that the notion of totalitarianism today functions as a kind of “ideological antioxidant”, the purpose of which is to tame free radicals, prevent thinking, and thereby sustain the illusion of concord in late capitalist society. But the sting of Totalitarianism

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Citation:
Wood, Kelsey. "Did Somebody Say Totalitarianism? Five Interventions in the (Mis)use of a Notion". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 22 July 2010
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=23501, accessed 03 September 2015.]