First published in 1971, Lives of Girls and Women was Alice Munro's second book and achieved a greater popular success in Canada than her first, the short fiction collection Dance of the Happy Shades. Sometimes called a novel but perhaps better read as a short-story cycle, Lives of Girls and Women won the Canadian Booksellers' Award and is probably Munro's most well-known text. Its refusal to sentimentalize rurality and childhood is notable, while its frank, nuanced exploration of a girl's life and the social limitations imposed on it have been of great interest to feminist critics. Although both earlier and later texts by Munro feature a first-person narration about a woman growing up in a small town, Lives r…

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Citation:
McGill, Robert. "Lives of Girls and Women". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 30 June 2002
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=3893, accessed 30 July 2015.]