Margaret Mitchell: Gone With the Wind

(3828 words)

Scarlett O’Hara was not beautiful, but men seldom realized it when caught by her charm as the Tarleton twins were. In her face were too sharply blended the delicate features of her mother, a Coast aristocrat of French descent, and the heavy ones of her florid Irish father. But it was an arresting face, pointed of chin, square of jaw. Her eyes were pale green without a touch of hazel, starred with bristly black lashes and slightly tilted at the ends. Above them, her thick black brows slanted upward, cutting a startling oblique line in her magnolia-white skin – that skin so prized by Southern women and so carefully guarded with bonnets, veils and mittens against hot Georgia suns.

Thus begins Gone …

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Citation:
Gomez-Galisteo, M. Carmen. "Gone With the Wind". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 05 May 2008
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=4925, accessed 01 August 2015.]


Related Groups

  1. American Civil War
  2. Literature of the American South