Amitav Ghosh: Dancing in Cambodia, At Large in Burma

(969 words)
  • John Thieme (University of East Anglia)

Dancing in Cambodia, At Large in Burma (1998) is made up of three parts: the two longish travel-essays of the book's title and a shorter Cambodian piece, “Stories in Stones”. Ghosh's capacity to find patterns in apparently unconnected events is at its best in “Dancing in Cambodia”, which links the 1906 visit of Cambodia's King Sisowath, his entourage, and a troupe of Cambodian classical dancers, to France, with the recent history of the country decimated by the Khmer Rouge Revolution. Ghosh interviews a number of figures who provide living testimony to the interconnectedness of these two narratives. They include a famous dancer, Chea Samy, who has first-hand knowledge of King Sisowath and his daughter Princess …

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Thieme, John. "Dancing in Cambodia, At Large in Burma". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 28 March 2003
[, accessed 01 December 2015.]

Related Groups

  1. Travel writing