Charles Dickens: A Tale of Two Cities

(2354 words)

As the preface to A Tale of Two Cities reminds us, the novel was inspired by the magnum opus of Charles Dickens's friend and mentor Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution (1837). A Tale of Two Cities was originally published in installments to launch Dickens's new journal All the Year Round (which replaced his earlier publication Household Words 1850-1859) from 30 April 1859 to 26 November of the same year. The novel appeared concurrently in monthly parts, with illustrations by Dickens's long-time collaborator Hablôt Knight Browne. A Tale of Two Cities is one of Dickens's most painstakingly researched works, and the author recounts re-reading The French Revolution over and over again, …

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Citation:
Moore, Grace. "A Tale of Two Cities". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 09 December 2004
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=6942, accessed 29 August 2015.]