; Literary Encyclopedia

Recommended reading for Chinua Achebe

Punter, David. Postcolonial Imaginings: Fictions of a New World Order. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000. Print.

Recommended by Cristina Sandru

David Punter’s study includes more than thirty five writers in English, from celebrated figures such as Chinua Achebe, Edward Brathwaite, Wilson Harris, V. S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Wole Soyinka or Salman Rushdie to lesser-known figures such as Susan Power, Joan Riley, Vikram Chandra or Arundhati Roy. It thus brings together writings from various postcolonial regions, India, black Africa, the Caribbean, Canada, South Africa, Australia, even Scotland and Ireland. To this Punter adds diasporic texts produced in the metropolis by writers such as Rushdie and Kureishi, as well as the American writers Toni Morrison and Susan Power. The selection is highly eclectic and the over-ambitiousness of the author to encompass all different variants of English-language postcoloniality may fall easy prey to charges of superficiality and looseness. Yet the real location is not geographic; instead, the book is organised thematically around a series of key preoccupations: the violence of geography; dreams, hallucinations and the ghostly; rage and hatred, trauma and loss; diaspora and exile; melancholy and mourning; displacement and its ensuing nostalgia. Even if short, the penetrating analyses never fail to capture something essential to the universe and atmosphere of the texts being referred to.

Punter, David. Postcolonial Imaginings: Fictions of a New World Order. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000. Print.

Recommended by Cristina Sandru

David Punter’s study includes more than thirty five writers in English, from celebrated figures such as Chinua Achebe, Edward Brathwaite, Wilson Harris, V. S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Wole Soyinka or Salman Rushdie to lesser-known figures such as Susan Power, Joan Riley, Vikram Chandra or Arundhati Roy. It thus brings together writings from various postcolonial regions, India, black Africa, the Caribbean, Canada, South Africa, Australia, even Scotland and Ireland. To this Punter adds diasporic texts produced in the metropolis by writers such as Rushdie and Kureishi, as well as the American writers Toni Morrison and Susan Power. The selection is highly eclectic and the over-ambitiousness of the author to encompass all different variants of English-language postcoloniality may fall easy prey to charges of superficiality and looseness. Yet the real location is not geographic; instead, the book is organised thematically around a series of key preoccupations: the violence of geography; dreams, hallucinations and the ghostly; rage and hatred, trauma and loss; diaspora and exile; melancholy and mourning; displacement and its ensuing nostalgia. Even if short, the penetrating analyses never fail to capture something essential to the universe and atmosphere of the texts being referred to.

Punter, David. Postcolonial Imaginings: Fictions of a New World Order. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2000. Print.

Recommended by Cristina Sandru

David Punter’s study includes more than thirty five writers in English, from celebrated figures such as Chinua Achebe, Edward Brathwaite, Wilson Harris, V. S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Wole Soyinka or Salman Rushdie to lesser-known figures such as Susan Power, Joan Riley, Vikram Chandra or Arundhati Roy. It thus brings together writings from various postcolonial regions, India, black Africa, the Caribbean, Canada, South Africa, Australia, even Scotland and Ireland. To this Punter adds diasporic texts produced in the metropolis by writers such as Rushdie and Kureishi, as well as the American writers Toni Morrison and Susan Power. The selection is highly eclectic and the over-ambitiousness of the author to encompass all different variants of English-language postcoloniality may fall easy prey to charges of superficiality and looseness. Yet the real location is not geographic; instead, the book is organised thematically around a series of key preoccupations: the violence of geography; dreams, hallucinations and the ghostly; rage and hatred, trauma and loss; diaspora and exile; melancholy and mourning; displacement and its ensuing nostalgia. Even if short, the penetrating analyses never fail to capture something essential to the universe and atmosphere of the texts being referred to.

Gikandi, Simon. Reading Chinua Achebe: Language and Ideology in Fiction. London: James Currey, 1991. Print.

Recommended by Herbert Ekwe Ekwe

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