; Literary Encyclopedia

Recommended reading for Commentarii de Bello Gallico

Caesar, Julius. The Gallic War. Trans. H.J. Edwards. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1917. Print.

Recommended by Thomas Reginald Stevenson

The Loeb edition of the BG, which carries the Latin text and an English translation on opposing pages, is still widely used by tertiary students and academics alike.

Caesar, Julius. The Gallic War. Trans. C. Hammond. Rochester and London: Oxford University Press, 1996. Print.

Recommended by Thomas Reginald Stevenson

An excellent translation with strong introduction and explanatory notes.

Costantini, M.“Xénophon Ou l’art De La Bonne Distance.” Cultura in Cesare: Atti Del Convegno Internazionale Di Studi, Macerata-Matelica, 30 Aprile-4 Maggio 1990. Ed. D. Poli. Rome: Il Calamo, 1993. 137-48. Print.

Recommended by Thomas Reginald Stevenson

A study of some motives behind use of the third person by Xenophon and Caesar.

Collins, J.H.“Caesar As Political Propagandist.” Aufstieg Und Niedergang Der römischen Welt 1.1. Berlin & New York: Walter de Gruyter & Co, 1972. 922-66. Print.

Recommended by Thomas Reginald Stevenson

An important corrective to the insensitive view of Caesar as a blatant propagandist.

Fraenkel, Edvard.“Eine Form römischer Kriegsbulletin.” Eranos 54 (1956): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Thomas Reginald Stevenson

Some thoughts on the nature of military dispatches sent to the Roman senate.

Gardner, J.F.“The ’Gallic Menace’ in Caesar’s Propaganda.” Greece & Rome 30 (1983): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Thomas Reginald Stevenson

On the ‘Gallic menace’ as a propagandist theme in the first and later books of the BG.

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