Pamela Hansford Johnson (2757 words)

Download PDF Save to Bookshelf Share on Facebook Tweet Report an Error

“And so goodbye to ’34, with literary progress beyond all my dreams”

The above quotation ended the 22-year-old Pamela Hansford Johnson’s diary for 1934. Despite notable achievements at grammar school, she had been forced to leave formal education at 16 due to her widowed mother’s financial hardships, and had had to work as a secretary while augmenting her income with token remuneration from poems and short stories commissioned by small magazines. There has been no published collection of her short stories, although it is arguable that some of these can stand comparison with those of Katherine Mansfield or Elizabeth Bowen. In February 1934, however, a book of her poems had been published, and her first novel, T…

We have have no profile for this entry. If you are a qualified scholar and you wish to write for The Literary Encyclopedia, please click here to contact us.



Citation:
Pollard, Wendy. "Pamela Hansford Johnson". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 24 February 2015
[https://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=2385, accessed 20 November 2017.]

Articles on Johnson's works

  1. The "Dorothy Merlin" Trilogy: The Unspeakable Skipton, Night and Silence, Who is Here?, Cork Street, Next to the Hatters
  2. The "Helena Trilogy": Too Dear for My Possessing, An Avenue of Stone and A Summer to Decide

Save this article

If you need to create a new bookshelf to save this article in, please make sure that you are logged in, then go to your 'Account' here.