Post-colonialism, Postcolonialism (3769 words)

Literary/ Cultural Context Essay

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Writing in his Imaginary Homelands about the importance of hybridity, novelist Salman Rushdie mockingly suggests that “‘Authenticity’ is the respectable child of old-fashioned exoticism. It demands that sources, forms, style, language and symbol all derive from a supposedly homogeneous and unbroken tradition. Or else” (1992: 67). Rushdie is more interested in the vitality of hybrid realities than he is in myths of unbroken tradition. If one thing has undermined such tradition, arguably it is colonialism: by violently thrusting together different traditions, colonialism has produced multiple forms of hybridity – a term which, in this particular context, will be used with reference to the mixed-up qualities of c…

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Citation:
Huddart, David. "Post-colonialism, Postcolonialism". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 02 October 2007
[https://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=886, accessed 23 October 2017.]


Related Groups

  1. Postcolonial literature - Britain, The Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand
  2. Postcolonial Theory and Criticism

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