William Gilpin

(2079 words)
  • Zoë Kinsley (Liverpool Hope University)

William Gilpin is perhaps best known for his writings on art and aesthetics, and particularly as the founder of the aesthetic school of the picturesque. However, it was the roles of schoolmaster and clergyman that most fundamentally shaped his life, and he developed innovative and enlightened theories on education and the disciplining of the young. Gilpin's literary output extends far beyond his popular travelogues and aesthetic tracts; he was also a prolific biographer and author of theological works aimed at the general reader.

Born on 4 June 1724 at Scaleby Castle, near Carlisle, in Cumberland, William Gilpin was the eldest son of Captain John Bernard Gilpin (1701-1776) and Matilda Langstaffe (1703-1773). The Gilpin …

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Citation:
Kinsley, Zoë. "William Gilpin". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 03 February 2005
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=1754, accessed 30 July 2014.]

Articles on Gilpin's works

  1. Observations on the River Wye, and Several Parts of South Wales, chiefly relative to Picturesque Beauty, made in the summer of the year 1770

Related Groups

  1. Picturesque landscape and gardens
  2. Travel writing