Christopher Isherwood

(2170 words)
  • James Berg (College of the Desert)

Christopher Isherwood’s life and writing are often seen in two conveniently defined halves: one English, the other American. The early, English part of Isherwood’s oeuvre forms the basis for conventional appraisals of his work. The novel Goodbye to Berlin (1939), a loose collection of stories and sketches, provided the source material for Cabaret, the musical play (1966) and film (1972). The later, American, half is gaining recognition for its groundbreaking openness in the treatment of homosexuality. The novel A Single Man (1964) is seen by many, especially in the United States, as a masterpiece of characterization, style and precision. As with all convenient …

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Berg, James . "Christopher Isherwood". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 02 May 2005
[, accessed 28 November 2015.]

Articles on Isherwood's works

  1. A Single Man
  2. Goodbye to Berlin

Related Groups

  1. Queer (GLBT) Literature