Wilfrid Gibson

(419 words)
  • James Bridges (Independent Scholar)

Wilfrid Gibson was born in October 1878, the son of a Northumberland pharmacist. His early collections, for example – The Queen's Vigil (1902) and The Golden Helm (1903) – display an ornate medievalism, derived mainly from Pre-Raphaelitism. There was then a striking transition, in which Gibson found a voice that was very much his own. The poems in Daily Bread (1910) exhibit a strong degree of realism. Sympathetically portraying the struggles and miseries of ordinary working-class people, they engage with unemployment, poverty, illness, illegitimate birth, bereavement, and domestic violence. Daily Bread thus reflects the compassion that distinguishes Gibson's verse as a whole – especially with regard to w…

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Citation:
Bridges, James. "Wilfrid Gibson". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 20 November 2001
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=4980, accessed 24 November 2014.]


Related Groups

  1. World War 1 Literature
  2. Georgian Poetry