Gaspara Stampa

(2205 words)
  • Jane Tylus (New York University)

One of the most accomplished poets of the Renaissance – and probably the most accomplished woman ever to write in Italian – Gaspara Stampa had a brief but tumultuous life. In an era when the chaste widow Vittoria Colonna provided the dominant model for women poets, Stampa's poetry of tormented passion directed to not one but at least two men offered an intriguingly original and for many, no doubt, unacceptable perspective. The three hundred and ten sonnets, canzoni, madrigals, and capitoli published posthumously by her sister Cassandra as Rime di Madonna Gaspara Stampa in 1554 convey an immediacy and frankness rare for their time. This is clear from the opening sonnet, …

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Citation:
Tylus, Jane. "Gaspara Stampa". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 09 September 2009
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=12294, accessed 24 November 2014.]


Related Groups

  1. Renaissance Women's Writing
  2. Italian Women's Writing