Within current scholarship, Claire de Duras (1777–1828) is best known for her novella Ourika (1823), which is considered to be the first narrative written from the perspective of a black woman. The innovative nature of this work, which was rediscovered in the 1970s as the fields of feminist and post-colonial studies were emerging, has attracted much scholarly attention. With her other finished fictional works, Édouard (1825) and Olivier ou le Secret (written 1821; published in 1971), Duras is acquiring increasing significance as a writer concerned with self-determination and otherness. The appearance of two unfinished emigration memoirs – Mémoires de Sophie and Amélie et Pauline – in 2011, …

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Citation:
Allan, Stacie. "Claire de Duras". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 29 February 2016
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=12920, accessed 28 September 2016.]

Articles on Duras' works

  1. Edouard
  2. Olivier
  3. Ourika