George Whalley was an eminent and accomplished Canadian man of letters. A poet and scholar, and a leading expert on the life and writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, he was also a biographer, translator, radio broadcaster, and musician. His best writing embodies a profound understanding of criticism as heuristic inquiry, art as a process of discovery, and language and literature as central to our humanity. A notable figure in the second half of his life, he deserves a renewed recognition and attention for his achievements.

Whalley was born in Kingston, Ontario. His father, the Very Reverend Arthur Francis Cecil Whalley, was the Dean of St George’s Anglican Church in Kingston at the time, and later became the Dean of Nova …

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Citation:
DiSanto, Michael. "George Whalley". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 16 July 2012
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=12921, accessed 31 August 2015.]

Articles on Whalley's works

  1. A Place of Liberty: Essays on the government of Canadian Universities
  2. Aristotle’s Poetics
  3. Coleridge and Sara Hutchinson and the Asra Poems
  4. Death in the Barren Ground: The Diary of Edgar Christian
  5. No Man An Island
  6. Poems 1939-1944
  7. Poetic Process
  8. Studies in Literature and the Humanities: Innocence of Intent
  9. The Collected Poems of George Whalley
  10. The Legend of John Hornby
  11. Writing in Canada: Proceedings of the Canadian Writers’ Conference Held at Queen’s University, 28-31 July, 1955