John Dryden (2215 words)

  • Barbeau Gardiner Anne (John Jay College, CUNY)

John Dryden (1631-1700) is one of England’s great literary figures. He ranks on a par with Chaucer, Spenser and Milton. As poet laureate and historiographer royal during the reigns of Charles II and James II, he published works in a variety of modes: heroic drama, tragedy, comedy, satire, historical poetry, religious poetry, elegy, song, literary criticism, and translation. In heroic drama, literary criticism and some other forms, he was a groundbreaker. His works, which fill twenty volumes in the modern California edition, are especially characterized by the bond he forges between history and poetry. As a public poet who interprets contemporary history from an Olympian perspective, Dryden has never been surpassed. History for him is a…

Citation:
Anne, Barbeau Gardiner. "John Dryden". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 18 January 2007
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=1320, accessed 08 December 2016.]

Articles on Dryden's works

  1. A Song for Saint Cecilia's Day
  2. Absalom and Achitophel
  3. All for Love, or The World Well Lost
  4. Aureng-Zebe
  5. Don Sebastian
  6. Fables Ancient and Modern
  7. Mac Flecknoe
  8. The Tempest