Louise Erdrich

(2098 words)
  • Amanda Morris (Kutztown University of Pennsylvania)

For over three decades, Louise Erdrich has brought the experiences of Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) people to the world through her fourteen novels, volumes of poetry, short stories, children’s books, and a memoir about being a mother and writer (The Blue Jay’s Dance). Most recently, Erdrich won the 2012 National Book Award for Fiction for The Round House, a novel about a family and community almost torn apart by injustice, moral failure, and violence, but for their faith, traditions, and stories. At the award ceremony, Erdrich accepted this prestigious honor, saying “In the spirit of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa people, and in recognition of the grace and the endurance of Native women” (National Book Award P…

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Citation:
Morris, Amanda. "Louise Erdrich". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 17 January 2014
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=1440, accessed 28 August 2015.]

Articles on Erdrich's works

  1. The Round House

Related Groups

  1. Native American and Canadian Writing