Isaak Babel´'s early story “Odessa” seems, at first glance, to be a modest piece of reportage about his home town. But, as is so often the case with Babel', the text soon becomes a metaliterary meditation on art itself:

And now my thoughts move on from my Odessan discourse to higher matters. If you think about it, doesn't it strike you that in Russian literature there haven't been so far any real clear, cheerful descriptions of the sun?

According to Babel', Ivan Turgenev “poeticized the dewy morning, the calm night”, whereas “with Fedor Dostoevskii you f…

Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are not a subscriber, please click here to read about membership. All our articles have been written recently by experts in their field, more than 95% of them university professors.

Citation:
Bullock, Philip Ross. "Isaak Babel". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 18 September 2006
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=204, accessed 18 September 2014.]

Articles on Babel's works

  1. Konarmiya [Red Cavalry]