Augustus Baldwin Longstreet

(1605 words)
  • David Rachels

Today, Augustus Baldwin Longstreet's fame rests on Georgia Scenes, Characters, Incidents, Etc. in the First Half Century of the Republic, a collection of sketches that he published from the office of his newspaper, the Augusta, Georgia, State Rights' Sentinel in 1835. To Longstreet, however, Georgia Scenes was merely one item in a long and distinguished résumé. In 1859, when William Gilmore Simms asked him to write an autobiography for The New American Cyclopædia, Longstreet responded with a long paragraph that allotted only one sentence to Georgia Scenes:

[Augusts Baldwin Longstreet is] an American jurist and author, born in Augusta, [Georgia], Sept. 22, 1790. He w…
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Citation:
Rachels, David. "Augustus Baldwin Longstreet". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 13 November 2002
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=2786, accessed 04 August 2015.]

Articles on Longstreet's works

  1. Georgia Scenes, Characters, Incidents, Etc. in the First Half Century of the Republic
  2. Master William Mitten: or, A Youth of Brilliant Talents, Who Was Ruined by Bad Luck