Petrus Ramus

(2027 words)
  • Emma Annette Wilson (University of Alabama)

Logician and innovative pedagogue, Petrus Ramus pursued an illustrious scholarly career, rising from humble origins in rural France to become Royal Professor of Eloquence and Philosophy in Paris in 1551. Most famous for his challenge towards university scholasticism and Aristotelian principles, Ramus produced his own reformed system of logic that would bear his name. An early modern phenomenon, his texts fell into relative obscurity after the seventeenth century, but prior to that he exerted great influence in the pedagogical, intellectual, and literary spheres. A perennially controversial figure, Ramus caused massive debate in the academic world by challenging the principles on which it was based. He died a prominent victim of the St …

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Citation:
Wilson, Emma Annette. "Petrus Ramus". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 17 May 2008
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=3703, accessed 20 December 2014.]


Related Groups

  1. Renaissance and Humanism