Owen was the most original and challenging among the English soldier poets of the First World War. Killed in action at the age of 25, a week before the Armistice, he left behind a small body of work, most of it not published until 1920, that includes some of the most moving poems of war in the English language: “Strange Meeting”, “Futility”, “Anthem for Doomed Youth”, “Dulce and Decorum Est”, and others drafted during his recovery from shell-shock in 1917-18. In technique, he was the first poet in English to develop the possibilities of a form of half-rhyming which later became known as pararhyme.

Owen was born on 18 March, 1893, at Oswestry, Shropshire, the eldest child of Tom Owen, a railway official, and Susan O…

Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are a member (student of staff) of a subscribing institution (see List), you should be able to access the LE on campus directly (without the need to log in), and off-campus either via the institutional log in we offer, or via your institution's remote access facilities, or by creating a personal user account with your institutional email address. If you are not a member of a subscribing institution, you will need to purchase a personal subscription. For more information on how to subscribe as an individual user, please see under Individual Subcriptions.

Citation:
Baldick, Chris. "Wilfred Owen". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 26 September 2013
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=4920, accessed 01 May 2016.]

Articles on Owen's works

  1. Anthem for Doomed Youth
  2. Dulce et Decorum Est
  3. Futility
  4. Strange Meeting

Related Groups

  1. World War 1 Literature