Agatha Christie

(1539 words)
  • Chris Willis (London Metropolitan University)

Agatha Christie, the “Queen of Crime”, has sold more books than any other writer of detective stories. Written in clear, unpretentious English, her books are intriguing puzzles which lead the bemused reader through shoals of red herrings until the murderer’s identity is revealed in the final chapter. She hated violence, and saw detective stories as modern morality tales about “the hunting down of Evil and the triumph of Good”.

Chriistie was born Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller on 15 September 1890 at her parents’ home just outside Torquay. On Christmas Eve 1914 she married RFC pilot Archie Christie, but they were separated by the First World War, and were not to live together until 1918. During the …

Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are not a subscriber, please click here to read about membership. All our articles have been written recently by experts in their field, more than 95% of them university professors.

Citation:
Willis, Chris. "Agatha Christie". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 16 July 2001
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=5054, accessed 24 April 2014.]

Articles on Christie's works

  1. A Caribbean Mystery
  2. A Murder is Announced
  3. Absent in the Spring
  4. At Bertram's Hotel
  5. Crooked House
  6. Curtain: Poirot's Last Case
  7. Dead Man's Folly
  8. Death on the Nile
  9. Endless Night
  10. Hallowe'en Party
  11. Mrs. McGinty's Dead
  12. Murder in Mesopotamia
  13. Murder on the Orient Express
  14. Nemesis
  15. Ordeal by Innocence
  16. Peril at End House
  17. Sleeping Murder
  18. The Body in the Library
  19. The Mousetrap
  20. The Moving Finger
  21. The Murder at the Vicarage
  22. The Mysterious Affair at Styles
  23. The Mystery of the Blue Train
  24. The Pale Horse
  25. Towards Zero

Related Groups

  1. Crime, Detective, Spy/ Thriller Fiction