(4267 words)
  • Mandy Green (University of Durham)

“Our Vergil” (noster Vergilius), as Seneca claims him with more than a touch of nationalistic pride, was universally acclaimed in the Roman world as the greatest of their poets and a worthy rival of the Greek epic poet, Homer. Virgil's influence on the literature of medieval, renaissance and modern Europe has likewise been incalculable. Virgil's reputation rests on three works: the Eclogues a highly crafted collection of pastoral poems modelled on the Idyls of the Sicilian Greek poet Theocritus; the Georgics (“On husbandry”), a practical handbook on farming matters that is nevertheless deeply informed by larger and more philosophical concerns in the didactic tradition of the early Greek poet Hesiod (

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Green, Mandy. "Virgil". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 21 March 2002
[, accessed 13 October 2015.]

Articles on Virgil's works

  1. The Aeneid
  2. The Eclogues
  3. The Georgics