Annette von Droste-Hülshoff

(2983 words)
  • Martha Helfer (Rutgers University)

“I neither want nor intend to become famous now, but in one hundred years I wish to be read.” Thus presciently asserted Germany's most beloved and celebrated nineteenth-century woman writer in a personal letter dating from 1843. During her lifetime Annette von Droste-Hülshoff achieved modest recognition, first as a relatively obscure regional author, then as a significant and original literary figure. Her true poetic genius was widely recognized only posthumously. The inclusion of her novella Die Judenbuche [The Jews' Beech Tree, 1842] in Heyse and Kurz's Deutscher Novellenschatz [Treasury of German Novellas, 1876] secured the Westphalian poetess's …

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Citation:
Helfer, Martha. "Annette von Droste-Hülshoff". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 12 July 2006
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=5444, accessed 31 October 2014.]

Articles on Droste-Hülshoff's works

  1. Die Judenbuche [The Jew's Beech Tree]