Jimmy Carter

(3125 words)
  • David C. Dougherty (Loyola University Maryland)

Over more than two centuries, American Presidents have run the gamut from the very able to borderline incompetent. Some have increased the prestige of the office; others have diminished it. Very few, however, have brought dignity and gravitas to the office itself after they left it. And none has done so to the degree of the thirty-ninth president, Jimmy Carter. Twenty-two years after he lost his campaign for re-election, President Carter's exemplary devotion to peace, justice, and human dignity was recognized by his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, an honor no American president had achieved since Woodrow Wilson (1919) and Theodore Roosevelt (1906). In 1980 a repudiated national leader, Carter emerged from devastating political and …

Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are a member (student of staff) of a subscribing institution (see List), you should be able to access the LE on campus directly (without the need to log in), and off-campus either via the institutional log in we offer, or via your institution's remote access facilities, or by creating a personal user account with your institutional email address. If you are not a member of a subscribing institution, you will need to purchase a personal subscription. For more information on how to subscribe as an individual user, please see under Individual Subcriptions.

Dougherty, David C.. "Jimmy Carter". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 10 September 2004
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=5827, accessed 26 November 2015.]