Sprung Rhythm

(170 words)
  • Editors

Literary/ Cultural Context Note

  • The Literary Encyclopedia. Volume : WORLD HISTORY AND IDEAS: A CROSS-CULTURAL VOLUME.

A term used by Gerard Manley Hopkins to describe the rhythm of most language and music which he observed to be patterned by a regular beat of stressed syllables, interspersed with a variable number of unstressed syllables. In Hopkins’ view, each foot began with a stress so the natural types of rhythm were dactyl, spondee and trochee, as in the following:

Spring and Fall
to a young child

Márgarét áre you gríeving
Over Goldengrove unleaving?
Leáves líke the things of man, you
With your fresh thoughts care for, can you?
Áh! ás the heart grows older
It will come to such sights colder
By and by, nor spare a sigh
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Citation:
Editors. "Sprung Rhythm". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 01 November 2001
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=1036, accessed 23 July 2016.]