Fortnightly Review, The

(133 words)
  • Editors

Literary/ Cultural Context Note

In reaction against the partisan journals already in the market, The Fortnightly Review was founded in 1865 by a group including the novelist Anthony Trollope, the jurist Frederic Harrison, and the Positivist Edward Spencer Beesly, as a means of broadcasting a range of ideas. Under the editorship of G. H. Lewes and then John Morley, however, it gradually became known as a liberal magazine, developing its own sense of political identity. Along with Macmillan's Magazine, it was one of the first magazines to have a policy of authors signing their articles. Before this point, it was standard policy for periodical articles to be written anonymously, but by the mid-nineteenth century this had become heavily disputed, as its …

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Editors. "Fortnightly Review, The". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 30 August 2013
[, accessed 02 December 2015.]

Related Groups

  1. Periodicals