(4566 words)

Historical Context Essay

The protests of 1968 challenged the ideological structures of the Cold War, and were the inevitable conclusion of changes which originated during the Second World War – a growing generational gap exacerbated by increased affluence, a surge in university attendance paired with a growing identity crisis, and a drive for change among the young, all conveyed by a blossoming international media network. 1968 challenged the permanence of traditional social structures and cultural hierarchies and left a complex legacy. The integration of protest into daily life gave rise to a fear of social atomisation and prefigured the terrorist movements of the next decade, but the year also marked a shift towards the democratisation and …

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Torrubia, Rafael. "1968". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 09 February 2011
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=9312, accessed 07 October 2015.]

Related Groups

  1. American Civil-Rights Movement in the 1960s