Thomas Mann: Der Zauberberg [The Magic Mountain]

(2277 words)
  • Hannelore G. Mundt

In 1929 Thomas Mann received the Nobel Prize for literature. In the laudatio his second great novel, Der Zauberberg [The Magic Mountain, 1924], was not mentioned – to the author’s dismay and fear that future generations would only remember him for his first novel, Buddenbrooks (1901). His apprehensions were unfounded. For decades, The Magic Mountain has ranked among the greatest novels of the 20th century and has consistently been included in “Great Books” courses due to its intellectual stature, its allegorical depiction of European history in the years before World War I, and Mann’s interweaving of universal themes – the seductions of love and death, man’s frailty and …

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Citation:
Mundt, Hannelore G.. "Der Zauberberg". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 26 September 2003
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=11470, accessed 01 September 2015.]