William Hogarth: The Four Times of Day and Strolling Actresses dressing in a Barn

(2957 words)

The Four Times of the Day and Strolling Actresses Dressing in a Barn (1738) were the first prints Hogarth published by subscription after the great financial success of the subscription publication of A Harlot's Progress (1732) and A Rake's Progress (1735). The Four Times of the Day are similar to A Harlot's Progress and A Rake's Progress in depicting a progress, in this case a chronological one from morning through noon and evening to night, but the prints are unlike their predecessors in that they do not depict a continuing personal narrative. None of the characters in one print re-appears in another. The Four Times of the Day present separate, humorous and satiric cameos o…

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Citation:
Gordon, Ian. "The Four Times of Day and Strolling Actresses dressing in a Barn". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 19 July 2003
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=12979, accessed 21 April 2014.]