Lucius Annaeus Seneca: Troades

(1949 words)

Seneca's play, Troades, explores the consequences of war, in this case the Trojan war, for both the victors and the defeated. The women and children of Troy, a huddled mass awaiting slavery and execution, gather together one final time for solace, and their laments and suffering make up the body of the tragedy. The play is a re-imagining of two Euripidean plays (Troades and Hecuba), but Seneca's style and poetics mark it as a product of the Neronian Renaissance – an explosion of creative literary and artistic activity sponsored by and responding to the emperor Nero (ruled 54-68). During this period authors renovated Augustan poetic genres (Lucan in epic, Persius in satire, Calpurnius Siculus in pastoral, …

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Citation:
Trinacty, Christopher . "Troades". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 04 May 2009
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=13465, accessed 21 October 2014.]