Howard Brenton: Brassneck

(911 words)
  • John Baker (University of Westminster)
  • Steve Barfield (University of Human Development, Suleymanyia, Iraqi Kurdistan)

Brassneck (Nottingham Playhouse, 1973) was an early collaboration by Howard Brenton and David Hare, and shares many of the features of their second jointly authored play, Pravda (1985). Through the story of a single family, Brassneck traces a history that parallels the Labour Party's advent to power in 1945 through to the property speculation of the 1960s and the disillusionment with the Labour government in the early 1970s. Like most of the early work of both writers, committed radical (if not revolutionary) socialists throughout the 1970s, it is a satirical attack on capitalist greed and corruption, full of savage, and often disturbing, humour. Brenton and Hare assault their audience with a play depicting a …

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Citation:
Baker, John, Steve Barfield. "Brassneck". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 07 February 2005
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=13572, accessed 03 September 2015.]