William Blake: The Book of Urizen

(251 words)
  • David Punter (University of Bristol)

The First Book of Urizen, as its title suggests, can be seen as the first book of Blake's “Infernal Bible”. In it he offers an alternative view of creation in a rewriting of the biblical Book of Genesis. According to this view, creation itself needs to be seen as an evil act because it follows from a command; it is the despotism of the god of reason and law, Urizen, that has called the world into being, and this is why it has automatically assumed a fallen form. In the poem, Urizen, having created the fallen world, is then drawn down into it himself, finding himself bafflingly and chaotically embroiled in his own nets and webs. The god Los, standing for the imaginative power, has been set to watch over Urizen, but …

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Citation:
Punter, David. "The Book of Urizen". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 17 July 2001
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=1402, accessed 01 August 2015.]


Related Groups

  1. English Romanticism