George Whalley: A Place of Liberty: Essays on the government of Canadian Universities

(503 words)

A Place of Liberty: Essays on the government of Canadian Universities is a collection of eleven essays that explore questions regarding the life of a modern university, its purpose and structure, its relationship with society, the powers of its different committees and governing bodies, and the relationships among the faculty, students, administrators, and bureaucrats of which it is comprised. Taken as a whole, the several threads in the arguments made by the different writers persuade readers to see the university as an institution with a distinctive character, which is not comparable to anything in business or industry, because it is responsible for the pursuit of ever-enlarging truth. The authors agree this makes corporate …

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Citation:
DiSanto, Michael. "A Place of Liberty: Essays on the government of Canadian Universities". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 22 December 2013
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=35208, accessed 30 August 2015.]