Philosopher, critic, historian and, for a while, even a politician, Benedetto Croce was a towering figure in Italian intellectual life in the first half of the twentieth century. Originally a proponent of philosophical idealism, he defended human creativity and the autonomy of artistic expression against the lure of social scientific “positivism”, refusing the reduction of history to a naturalistic paradigm and, in so doing, affirming a broadly liberal respect for individual freedom. At home, he inspired a generation of intellectuals such as, for example, the Marxist Antonio Gramsci, and later he came to be widely admired for his opposition to fascism. In Europe and America, Croce gained renown for his distinctive …

Please log in to consult the article in its entirety. If you are a member (student of staff) of a subscribing institution (see List), you should be able to access the LE on campus directly (without the need to log in), and off-campus either via the institutional log in we offer, or via your institution's remote access facilities, or by creating a personal user account with your institutional email address. If you are not a member of a subscribing institution, you will need to purchase a personal subscription. For more information on how to subscribe as an individual user, please see under Individual Subcriptions.

Martin, James. "Benedetto Croce". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 09 January 2009
[, accessed 01 December 2015.]