“Where literature exists, translation exists” (Grossman 2010: 33). In her brief but incisive book titled Why Translation Matters, expert translator Edith Grossman reminds us of the deep translational roots of all that we call literary: stories (including many that are considered foundational to a particular culture) are not static, but rather continually passed from generation to generation, community to community, and this cannot help but involve a complex process of interpretation and re-interpretation. The flowering of learning that ushered in Europe’s modern age, represented by the Renaissance, was rooted in a new access to texts that were being translated from Latin into the vernacular languages of Europe. A…

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Citation:
Henitiuk, Valerie. "Literary Translation". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 08 May 2012
[http://www.litencyc.com/php/stopics.php?rec=true&UID=19322, accessed 16 April 2014.]


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