; Literary Encyclopedia

Recommended reading for Middlemarch

Adam, Ian, ed. This Particular Web: Essays on Middlemarch. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1975. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Auerbach, Nina.“Dorothea’s Lost Dog.” Middlemarch in the Twenty-First Century. Ed. Karen Chase. Rochester and London: Oxford University Press, 2006. 87-105. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Daiches, David. George Eliot: Middlemarch. London: Edward Arnold, 1963. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Emarth, Elizabeth Deeds.“Negotiating Middlemarch.” Middlemarch in the Twenty-First Century. Ed. Karen Chase. Rochester and London: Oxford University Press, 2006. 107-31. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Emarth, Elizabeth Deeds.“George Eliot’s Invisible Community.” Realism and Consensus in the English Novel: Time, Space and Narrative. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998. 222-256. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Lodge, David.“Middlemarch and the Idea of the Classic Realist Text.” The Nineteenth-Century Novel: Critical Essays and Documents. Ed. Arnold Kettle. London, Ibadan and Nairobi: Heinemann, 1981. 218-238. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Starting with a critical response to Colin MacCabe's commentary on Eliot's narrational method (her "metalanguage") in his James Joyce and the Revolution of the Word (1979), Lodge offers a characteristically sound and informed commentary on how the narrator's voice serves to articulate and generalise the deeper meaning of the novel's representation of characters' supposed words and actions. Lodge traces modern critical and formal distinctions back to Plato's distinction of mimesis and diegesis, and lucidly and subtly shows how these terms are reworked in the nineteenth century novel, Middlemarch in particular. This is a very fine starting point for any critical consideration of the form of the novel.

McSweeney, Kerry. Middlemarch. London: Unwin Hyman, 1984. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

MacCabe, Colin.“The End of a Meta-Language: From George Eliot to Dubliners.” James Joyce and the Revolution of the Word. London: Macmillan, 1979. 13-38. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

This is a famous essay in which Colin MacCabe uses George Eliot as the ideal type of a realist writer in order to establish the critical difference in the work of Joyce. In essence, MacCabe explores how Eliot's narration (her metalanguage) relates to the sentences representing apparently real events. MacCabe's argument is clearly expressed and highly sophisticated, and it remains a seminal commentary on this aspect of Eliot's style in Middlemarch, as on novelistic realism in general. It is valuable to read David Lodge's (1972) response to MacCabe by way of comparison.

Adam, Ian, ed. This Particular Web: Essays on Middlemarch. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1975. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Auerbach, Nina.“Dorothea’s Lost Dog.” Middlemarch in the Twenty-First Century. Ed. Karen Chase. Rochester and London: Oxford University Press, 2006. 87-105. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Daiches, David. George Eliot: Middlemarch. London: Edward Arnold, 1963. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Emarth, Elizabeth Deeds.“Negotiating Middlemarch.” Middlemarch in the Twenty-First Century. Ed. Karen Chase. Rochester and London: Oxford University Press, 2006. 107-31. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Emarth, Elizabeth Deeds.“George Eliot’s Invisible Community.” Realism and Consensus in the English Novel: Time, Space and Narrative. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998. 222-256. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

McSweeney, Kerry. Middlemarch. London: Unwin Hyman, 1984. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Knoepflmacher, U. C. Religious Humanism and the Victorian Novel: George Eliot, Walter Pater and Samuel Butler. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1965. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Blake, Kathleen.“Middlemarch and the Woman Question.” Nineteenth-Century Fiction. 31 (1976): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Furst, Lillian R.“Struggling for Medical Reform in Middlemarch.” Nineteenth-Century Literature 48 (1993): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Miller, J. Hillis.“Narrative and History.” ELH 41 (1974): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Staten, Henry.“Is Middlemarch Ahistorical?.” PMLA 115 (2000): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Blake, Kathleen.“Middlemarch and the Woman Question.” Nineteenth-Century Fiction. 31 (1976): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Furst, Lillian R.“Struggling for Medical Reform in Middlemarch.” Nineteenth-Century Literature 48 (1993): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Miller, J. Hillis.“Narrative and History.” ELH 41 (1974): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

Staten, Henry.“Is Middlemarch Ahistorical?.” PMLA 115 (2000): n. pag. Print.

Recommended by Robert Clark

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