Roman Witold Ingarden

Jan Wolenski
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The philosopher Roman Witold Ingarden was an important contributor to phenomenology, ontology, and aesthetics, who defended realist phenomenology against Husserl’s later transcendental idealism. In aesthetics, he elaborated a theory of the literary work according to which literary works have a complex structure and exist as intentional objects.

Life. 1

Life. 1

Views. 1

Views. 1

Ontology. 2

Ontology. 2

Ingarden’ Theory of the Literary Work. 5

Ingarden’ Theory of the Literary Work. 5

Ingarden’s Influence. 5

Ingarden’s Influence. 5

Life

Life

Roman Ingarden was born in Kraków on February 5th, 1893. He began his studies at the Polish-language University of Lwów (also known as Lemberg under the Austrian partition, today Lviv in western Ukraine) under Kazimierz Twardowski in 1911, but moved to

2890 words

Citation: Wolenski, Jan. "Roman Witold Ingarden". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 01 November 2010 [https://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=12591, accessed 14 July 2024.]

12591 Roman Witold Ingarden 1 Historical context notes are intended to give basic and preliminary information on a topic. In some cases they will be expanded into longer entries as the Literary Encyclopedia evolves.

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