Edouard Dujardin (2687 words)

Édouard Dujardin’s modest renown in the history of 19th-century French literature owes little to what he was most known for in his lifetime. In the 1880s, he was famed for his prowess as an avant-garde editor whose accomplishments included the foundation of the Revue wagnérienne, a publication that spearheaded the nascent Symbolist movement. Today, he is rather remembered as a minor novelist who happened to be a great formal innovator. This shift in reputation stemmed from the interest of James Joyce and his fellow modernists, who rediscovered Dujardin’s contributions as a fiction writer more than thirty years after his first novel, Les Lauriers sont coupés (1887), had been written and r…

Citation:
Heck, Adeline. "Edouard Dujardin". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 31 January 2017
[https://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=13730, accessed 22 March 2019.]

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