J. D. Salinger

John Wenke (Salisbury State University)
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J. D. Salinger began his career as a publishing fiction writer in1940 with the appearance of “The Young Folks” in

Story

and concluded it in 1965 with the publication of “Hapworth 16, 1924” in the

New Yorker

.

The Catcher in the Rye

(1951) remains Salinger's masterwork. In the novel Holden Caulfield provides a vibrant account of “this madman stuff that happened to me around last Christmas just before I got pretty run-down and had to come out here and take it easy.” Holden's comic and harrowing escapades have made him a cultural hero. This alienated teenager with a slash of gray hair seems more a confused loner than an iconoclastic rebel. Alternately brash and sentimental Holden hates “phonies,” longs for innocence and styles himself a champion of vulnerable children…

2534 words

Citation: Wenke, John. "J. D. Salinger". The Literary Encyclopedia. First published 17 September 2004 [https://www.litencyc.com/php/speople.php?rec=true&UID=3915, accessed 16 July 2024.]

3915 J. D. Salinger 1 Historical context notes are intended to give basic and preliminary information on a topic. In some cases they will be expanded into longer entries as the Literary Encyclopedia evolves.

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